All about Qigong


What does Qigong mean?

Qi (pronounced “Chi”) is the Chinese term for energy.

Gong (pronounced “Gung”) is often translated as “work” or “skill”, so Qigong would mean “working with the energy of your body”, or “cultivating energy”

Qigong is a branch of traditional Chinese medicine that does not require needles or herbs. It is an ancient exercise made up of gentle movements that connect with the acupuncture points and meridians (energy channels) of our body.

According to Chinese medicine, all illness is a result of obstructed Qi (energy) paths, or an imbalance of yin and yang. Qigong systematically moves Qi through the whole body, improving circulation and expelling stagnant energy.


Why I started Qigong

In the mid-nineties I was really ill.

My immune system was non-existent. I was on antibiotics every day. My eyesight was failing. I was having difficulty walking. As you can imagine, I was depressed, frustrated and stressed.

It seemed that Western medicine could not help me so I went to a Chinese doctor who showed me the benefits of traditional Chinese medicine, and then encouraged me to try Qigong.

When I first went to see Michael Tse – my teacher - he said Qigong is for health, and he was right! My own health began to improve and, through regular practice, has continued to do so.

Having seen what Qigong has done for me, I am now so passionate about it; I really want to help others learn this amazing skill.

“Qigong is the oil for our bodies, lubricating the joints so they do not get rusty”. Sifu Michael Tse.


What are the benefits of Qigong?

Qigong will help you to relax and become more aware of your body. As you practice, you will notice increased flexibility, energy and stamina.

Qigong has been credited with helping to combat diseases such as arthritis, heart disease, insomnia, asthma and skin trouble. Doctors in China recommend it for stress, depression, high blood pressure, digestive complaints and problems with muscles, tendons and bones, as well as back aches, neck and shoulder pain.

People suffering from the following complaints have also been helped by Qigong:

• Arthritis

• Chest and sinus infections

• Stomach ulcers

• Tiredness and lethargy

• Problems associated with menopause

“The gentle relaxing movements of Qigong are good for all ages and levels of fitness’. Sifu Michael Tse.


How does it work?

Opening the Qi channels allows the Qi to flow naturally, healing any old illnesses or injuries, making you feel younger, fitter and livelier.


Where should you practice Qigong?

Preferably outside, where the fresh air and the wonders of nature combine to give you an internal wash as you practice the forms.


How often should you practice Qigong?

Every day. It’s a way of life, just like brushing your teeth.


Wild Goose Qigong is the best!

In a recent study using Western methods and technology to compare the results of 600 styles of Qigong practices, Dayan (Wild Goose) Qigong was recognised as one of the most beneficial. Although the movements are simple and easy to learn, the results are profound.


The History of Wild Goose Qigong

Over 1,800 years ago, during the Jin Dynasty, there were a group of Daoist monks who lived in the Kunlun mountains in China. These sacred mountains offered a retreat where the monks could cultivate the skills of longevity and live in harmony with nature. It was here that the skill of Kunlun Dayan (Wild Goose) Qigong skill was founded, by imitating the graceful movements and strength of wild geese and combining them with Chinese medical theories to delay ageing and prolong life.

For many, many years, Dayan Qigong was passed on secretly within the Kunlun Qigong School. In 1980, following economic and political change in China, Grandmaster Yang Meijun, the 27th generation inheritor, decided to share her knowledge with the public so that more people could benefit from Dayan Qigong.

My teacher, Sifu Michael Tse, studied with the late Grandmaster Yang Meijin for over twenty years and brought the Kunlun Dayan Qigong to England in 1987. He is one of very few students authorised to teach her legacy. The learning and practice of Dayan Qigong follows the syllabus developed by Sifu Michael Tse.


Syllabus

• Qigong beginners start with gentle exercises and movements to get breathing, posture and relaxation in place. Initially we focus on movements to strengthen the body and increase Qi.

• Next comes the Dayan “First 64” form. This works on post-natal illnesses arising from unhealthy diet, environmental factors, work-related stress, lack of exercise and past injuries.

• Following that, I teach the “Second 64” form, which works on pre-natal illnesses, or weaknesses in the body which are hereditary. In these forms, there are a variety of fluttering, shaking, bending, stretching and twisting movements, which help rid the body of toxins, ill energy and negative Qi.

Please click here to see the full syllabus we follow.


The Tse Qigong Centre

All qualified Qigong instructors are tested every year, to make sure the quality of their teaching is kept high. Teachers passing the tests have their teaching certificates renewed by the Tse Qigong Centre.

Any student attending my classes will be asked to become a member of the Tse Qigong Centre in order to continue learning Wild Goose Qigong after three trial lessons. The membership fee is £25 per year for a single person or £40 per year for a family living at the same address.

Annual membership covers special issue of Qi Magazine, Centre polo shirts, reduced fees on courses and seminars organised by the Tse Qigong Centre, and the opportunity to attend members-only workshops with my teacher Sifu Michael Tse.

The Tse Qigong Centre:
PO Box 918-A, Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, KT1 9PA
Telephone number: 0845 838 2285
www.qimagazine.com


Wild Goose Qigong family tree

I am a 29th generation instructor authorised by the Tse Qigong Centre and my study lineage is as follows:

• Sifu (Teacher): Michael Tse, 28th generation of Wild Goose (Dayan) Qigong

• Sigong (Teacher’s teacher): Grandmaster Yang Meijun, 27th generation lineage holder of Dayan Qigong

Our lineage can be traced back over 29 generations for approximately 1800 years, to the Jin Dynasty 265 AD.

 

Kunlun Mountain
Daoist Founder
Dao An
(Jin Dynasty 265AD)
           
Grandmaster Yang De Shan
(circa 1840 - circa 1920)
Lineage: 26th Generation
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Tai Sigong
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Sijo
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Grandmaster Yang Meijun
(1898 - 2003)
Lineage: 27th Generation
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Sigong
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Tai Sigong
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Sijo
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Master Michael Tse
Lineage: 28th Generation
Founder of Tse Qigong Centre
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Sifu
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Sigong
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Tai Sigong
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Authorised Tse Qigong Centre Instructors Khim Guan
Lineage: 29th Generation
Sifu
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Sigong
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Khim's Students
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Sifu
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            Khim's Students' Students